Update

Jul. 6th, 2015 12:58 pm
tamorapierce: yellow sign showing figure banging head on desk (Default)
I know, I know, I haven't been around much. Mostly I've been working on GIFT OF POWER, now into 21 chapters (I hope my editor gives me places I can cut!). I'm also reeling a bit from two weeks of interrupted sleep. Our cat Scooter had a hematoma in his ear which had to be patched (with staples!), which means he's been in one of those ghastly plastic collars for two weeks. He was so miserable hanging out in my office (where he yowled and dug at the door all night, waking me repeatedly) that we installed him in our bedroom, to the dismay of the other cats, who use it as a quiet, shady place to sleep during the day. The problem? Scooter talks to me whenever I wake up, and when he isn't talking, he's trying to scratch--except he scratches the collar. This wakes me up, when he can talk to me again. So I'm a bit slap happy.

The 4th was quiet at our house. Sunday we went to watch Bollywood movies with the Covilles, this week's movie being "Jal (Water)." It wasn't a Bollywood song and dance fest, but a powerful movie about desert people in Gujurat, India trying to survive with wells, and a water finder who tries to find water. There are some white naturalists who come to try to save flamingos that nest near their lands, prompting the question, "What about the people?" It poses questions about water not only in India, but worldwide, and the water finder's story is beautiful. The desert people are amazing, and their women have a fair amount of power in their daily lives.

Oh, and I plowed through Robin Hobb's Soldier's Son trilogy that starts with SHAMAN'S CROSSING. Nevare is raised to be a soldier from the day he was born, but an encounter in his teens with the magic of the Speck people, who are resisting his nation's eastward expansion, tangles him and all around him in Speck magic, deployed by the ancestor he encountered against the nation of his birth. The magic ruins his career, his relationship with his family, and even his exile as he lives with half of his spirit in the Speck world, where the people are trying to drive his people out of their lands forever.

Hobb is never kind to her characters, and she doesn't make her heroes inherently likable, but Nevare's journey through the class upheaval in his world, the business of arranged marriages, attitudes toward weight in both peoples, and relationships with women, are all fascinating. Hobb shows human beings at their absolute worst without putting me off, and she is deft at moral quandaries. I recommend this trilogy for anyone who likes complex world and character building, class struggles, and a somewhat more even form of battle between Euro-type invaders and native people who want to keep their homes.

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tamorapierce: yellow sign showing figure banging head on desk (Default)
tamora pierce

September 2016

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